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As parents determine to divorce, it’s only fair to be truthful with the kids. Depending upon the ages of the children and family dynamics, some already may be well alert to the fact that there are issues, whereas others might not have any clue about what’s going on. If you have further questions about the Chicago child custody process, contact us today at our Illinois child custody lawyer office at (312) 884-1222 for a free consultation.

Ideally it’s best to collect together as a family to inform the kids of an impending separation or divorce. Doing so will present a united front. It will show the kids that although you’re getting divorced, both of you still love them and are united within your responsibility to them. Also, it permits a chance for the kids to get answers and ask questions of both parents.

  • During the family meeting it is vital to remain focused. It is not the time for placing blame, arguing, or belittling your partner. Decide beforehand what you’re going to say to the kids. Be certain that it’s age appropriate.
  • Do not assume that the kids really comprehend what a divorce is. It’s your duty as parents to place it into simple words that divorce occurs as two adults no longer can live together. Be certain the kids comprehend that divorce only is between adults.
  • It is not necessary for kids to overhear the details of your break up. What they need to know is that although parents no longer love one another, both of you still love them. Also, they must know that it isn’t their fault that your marriage is ending.
  • Kids usually are filled up with hope that their parents are going to reunite. Do not give your kids false hope that you’ll reconcile. Help them to understand that divorce is the end of a marriage and while it’s a normal emotion for kids to wish for their parents to reconcile, it’s unlikely that it’ll happen.

As the kids do not need to know about the details of your divorce they must to know how it’ll impact them and their day-to-day lives which include new living arrangements. Allow them to know how to communicate with one parent as they’re with the additional parent.

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Uncontested Divorce: What is it?

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In the plainest terms, uncontested divorce will mean that the partners have the ability to agree upon the major factors included in getting divorced, involving:

• How they’ll share parenting responsibilities and parenting time

• The duration and amount of child support

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If you are convinced that the marriage is irretrievably broken and you are headed for divorce, below are 9 measures to take.

Consult a Chicago divorce attorney

Become educated concerning your legal responsibilities and rights.

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A divorce includes the legal end of a marriage. A judge reviews and approves the divorce settlement or, if spouses cannot concur to a settlement, decides how property is divided and how parenting time is shared. Until you get the court order signed by the judge, you aren’t officially divorced and cannot remarry. The rules which are different in every state include how long you have to reside in the state prior to you being able to file for divorce, how long you have to wait prior to your divorce being completed after you file, and how the state will treat alimony and child support.

If you have any questions about the Illinois divorce process, contact us today at our Illinois divorce attorney office at (312) 884-1222.

Here include the basic choices you have to handle the house after and during the divorce.

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In Divorce Who Gets the House?

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If you are in the middle of a divorce, and want to keep your family home, there might be great reasons to fight for it. Because keeping a home or selling it after divorce may be a huge, life-changing event, it is vital that you know your reasons are sound, and that keeping your house is going to be in your best financial interest.

The children: School-aged kids might be traumatized by your divorce, and having to move might add to their emotional distress. If you are concerned about this and are not certain what is best for the family, consider talking to a family therapist or child psychologist who is able to assist you in figuring it out.

Emotional attachment: It is oftentimes an extremely emotional decision whether you should keep your family home; and even though emotional attachment isn’t necessarily a ‘great’ reason, it is an understandable one. Most spouses will become attached to their house because, for instance, they have put a lot of work into constructing their dream home, and it will hold many good memories, or because their house has been within one spouse’s family for generations.

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Here are some tips on how to get along well enough with your ex to make sure your children's emotional and physical needs are met and help your children get through the divorce feeling loved and secure. This is part 2 of a 2-part series.

(13) During time to pick up, don’t honk the car horn in front of the additional parent’s house. But, do not go in the house either – unless you’re invited in. Arrive on time for drop-off and pick-up and have your kids prepared to go.

(14) Transfers may be uncomfortable times. Be patient and kind with one another and the kids.

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Co-parenting with an ex-partner will have its challenges, not the least of which includes communicating with somebody you might’ve been thoroughly unable to speak to, or even be within the same room with. But, your kids deserve the best out of both parents, whether you can stand one another or not.

Below are tips on how you can get along long enough with your ex-spouse to make certain your youngster's physical and emotional needs are met and assist your kids in getting through the divorce feeling secure and loved. This is part 1 of a 2-part series.

(1) Divorced parents may succeed at co-parenting.

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Child Custody Terms Defined

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Child custody may be an extremely contentious factor in a divorce—and occasionally, the language which we use to define and discuss child custody arrangements also can be the topic of debate.

Physical and Legal Custody

The basic words are not overly controversial. ‘Legal custody’ can be defined as the right to make decisions concerning your youngster—things such as education (home-schooling, private, or public), medical/dental care (braces), and religious upbringing. The term ‘Physical custody’ will refer to the youngster’s physical presence in the home.

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Every state uses a ‘best interest of child’ standard within custody cases that are disputed. It’s a rather amorphous standard, and a standard which lends itself to judges’ subjective thoughts concerning what is best for kids. Though, there will include some factors you can expect a judge to take into account.

Age of children

Even though the ‘tender years’ doctrine has been out of fashion officially, a few judges still think that younger kids should reside with their mothers, particularly if she has been the main caregiver.

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Getting through a divorce might be easier if you are informed of the process before it starts. This post from our Chicago sole custody lawyer’s office provides 4 tips to aid in steering you through this tough time.

1. Court Isn’t All It Is Cracked Up to Be

As things aren’t going well within a divorce case, one partner might threaten to terminate negotiations and move forward with court proceedings. But, the path to a divorce trial is costly and long. The cost of a trial may deplete the assets which often are the subject of a dispute. Even simplistic matters may require several court days to complete, and upon spending thousands of dollars, partners and their lawyers are left with the uncertainty of how a judge might rule.

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Basics on Illinois Divorce

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These rules will apply to same-sex and opposite sex couples who are civil union partners, as well as opposite-sex married couples.

Grounds for Divorce

The state of Illinois recognizes both fault and no-fault grounds for divorce. To obtain a divorce based upon no-fault grounds, otherwise referred to as ‘irreconcilable differences,’ both parties must’ve been separated for at least two years. If both parties concur in writing to the divorce, only a 6 month separation is needed.

But, if both parties do not concur to the divorce, haven’t been separated for at least two years, and cannot get the court to waive a separation requirement, one of the partners may file for a divorce based upon fault grounds. Such grounds involve a felony conviction, cruelty, desertion, bigamy, adultery, or impotency. The Illinois family law court might require the partners to go to counseling or a conciliation conference or if there are kids involved, an educational program concerning the effects of divorce on kids.

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